Only 1 piece in stock!


Vntg Mexican Amate/Bark Painting Painting Mexican Folk Art Collectible Rabbits

$ 49.99 $ 58.99


  • Tall- 10"
  • Wide- 14"
  • Framed Wide- 16"
  • Framed Tall- 13"
  • Amate is form of bark paper made from the Ficus tree, that has been manufactured in Mexico since pre-Hispanic time.
  • This amate painting shows 2 very colorful rabbits? surrounded by colorful flowers and other designs.
  • Each piece of amate painting by Mexican artisans is a special piece of art.
  • History of Amate Painting
  • Paper was sacred to both the Mayans and the Aztecs. It was the medium on which their history and discoveries were chronicled. It kept their records of trade and tributes. It filled their libraries with documents for future generations.
  • Of no less importance, it was used in every religious ceremony as an intermediary between the people and the gods.
  • Once these needs were met, the remaining paper was given to the people for their personal use in rituals.
  • By the time Cortes arrived on the shores of Mesoamerica, there were at least forty-two papermaking centers, and they were producing almost half a million sheets of paper per year for use in tribute alone. The main papermaking centers were in the areas of what is now Veracruz, Morelos, Guerrero, Puebla, Hidalgo, and Oaxaca.
  • Today three major Indian groups of the Huasteca region - the Nahua, Otomi, and Tepeha - still make the amate paper. The fact that these people retained their knowledge of this craft is nothing short of miraculous, but it was probably helped by the fact that they live in remote areas where there is nothing to exploit.
  • By the 1940s and 1950s, the traditional papermaking techniques were starting to die out naturally. Then in the 1960s, amate was re-discovered. A new Nahua art form was starting to develop in the Balsas River basin in Guerrero.
  • Artisans of this region, who had once only decorated their pottery, were now putting their colorful paintings on this unique paper.
  • Ameyaltepec, a small village in the state of Guerrero, produced charming pottery painted in earth-reds which they decorated with mythical fauna and flora. In the early 1960s Max Kerlow, a folk arts dealer tired of broken pots being delivered over the mountains, introduced to the craftsmen of Ameyaltepec the idea of using amate for their painting instead of pottery.
  • The artisans of this remote village along with those from San Agustin Oapan and Xalitla - all within walking distance from one another - started to not only work on amate but to expand their repertoire to include religious festivals and scenes of village life. They used mostly natural colors and dyes and painted with animal hair and plant fiber brushes.
  • By the 1940s and 1950s, the traditional papermaking techniques were starting to die out naturally. Then in the 1960s, amate was re-discovered. A new Nahua art form was starting to develop in the Balsas River basin in Guerrero.
  • Artisans of this region, who had once only decorated their pottery, were now putting their colorful paintings on this unique paper.
  • Ameyaltepec, a small village in the state of Guerrero, produced charming pottery painted in earth-reds which they decorated with mythical fauna and flora. In the early 1960s Max Kerlow, a folk arts dealer tired of broken pots being delivered over the mountains, introduced to the craftsmen of Ameyaltepec the idea of using amate for their painting instead of pottery.
  • This wonderful vintage Pochteca mate painting will be an awesome addition to any art lover.


Recently viewed