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Blackwork Embroidery/Stitching Mexican Art Collectible Décor Hand of Fatima #2

$ 99.99
  • Amazing Blackwork Embroidery/Stitching.

  • Measurements
  • Height- 6"
  • Wide- 6"
  • Measurements For embroidery Only
  • Height- 4 3/4"
  • Wide- 4"

  • We are proud to introduce our newest artist, Gabriella Limon to Pochteca Gallery. Gabriella has been designing and selling her works at boutiques and private collectors throughout the United States and Mexico.

  • Gabriella is also an expert on European history and uses her knowledge of history to bring to life her art.

  • The Hand of Fatima also represents femininity, and is referred as the woman's holy hand. It is believed to have extraordinary characteristics that can protect people from evil and other dangers. It is speculated that Jews were among the first to use this amulet due to their beliefs about the evil eye.

  • Gabriella's designs take up to 2 weeks or more depending on the size.
  • This gorgeous Hand of Fatima design is embroidered with pink and green threads. The lovely piece is glued to an aida cotton canvas.

  • Gabriella has added a hanging hook on the back. You can also put it in a frame of your choice.

  • If there’s one thing to love about embroidery, it’s that there are a ton of different forms at your disposal. Stumpwork, goldwork and whitework are all traditional techniques still popular today, but there’s another that’s quickly re-emerging: blackwork.

  • Blackwork embroidery is recognized by its geometric designs that often use repeating floral, star and lattice patterns to fill the inside of a larger shape. While traditional blackwork involves a black thread being stitched onto a white linen or cotton (which may or may not feature accent colors or tones), today the term “blackwork” is more commonly used to describe the technique rather than the use of black thread — so it still uses the delicate, geometric designs, but can be stitched in any color.

  • Blackwork dates back to before the 16th century, and was popularized in England by Henry VIII’s first wife, Catherine of Aragon, who brought blackwork clothing with her from Spain. This is why blackwork is sometimes known as Spanish blackwork.

  • Colors are brighter in person.

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